Healt & security dhp

Icicles and Mouldiness

For most people, discussions on energy efficiency are academic.  They only seriously think about it when paying their heating bills, when it is too late.

It’s during winter that energy inefficiency is most obvious.  In fact, the enormous icicles and ice barrages that accumulate on roofs are flagrant proof of heat loss and an inefficient use of energy.  I am always surprised to hear intelligent people say that this is typically normal for our Quebec winters – just like apple pie is American.  What nonsense!

At the beginning of winter, heat loss through the eaves or the attic keeps the roof surface warm.  As snow starts to accumulate, it stays, even on slanted roofs.  After awhile, snow becomes the insulation and traps the air. The colder it gets, the more we heat the house and the more heat we lose, the more the eaves and roof surface warm up.

Monster Icicles

One day, the roof surface temperature reaches 0 degrees Celsius and the snow next to it softens and melts.  This melting snow transforms into water which slides down towards the edges.  As water accumulates at the roof edges and rain gutters, the water freezes as it contacts outside air which is colder than the roof surface.  Over time, the result is the formation of spectacular icicles – some reach one storey and more!  The greater the heat loss is, the greater the thickness of the ice barrages behind the icicles and the greater the length of the icicles.

When there’s a major thaw and rain with temperatures reaching at least +6 degrees Celsius, even in the Laurentians, infiltrations begin.  Frequently though, these do not come from the roof as such, they occur horizontally, from the edges.

In fact, the weight of the accumulated ice in the gutters opens up a joint on the edge of the roof, on the ledge or in the soffit, and the water leaking under the accumulated snow and ice in the roof penetrates to the ceilings.  To the greatest surprise of homeowners, even when ceilings have a slight slope, infiltrations can manifest themselves a good distance from the exterior wall.

It’s Raining in my Bed

To my greatest disappointment, this is what my family lived through at the summer cottage of my in-laws in the Laurentians, following a successful surprise party given for André Fauteux, editor of La maison du 21ième siècle.  Water started dripping from the ceiling onto our beds in the middle of the night.

Unfortunately in such cases many homeowners mistakenly blame their roof while the origin of the problem is the house’s heat loss.

Roofers are called in by panicking homeowners, and repairs are scheduled, even if no one has determined what the real cause of the problem is.  Redoing a roof when it is not necessary is a very costly additional energy loss.

Certain customers have told me that they have had their roof completely redone two or three times in 10 years but the problem has not disappeared.  This is outright robbery by the roofers!

In fact, as unbelievable as it may seem, many Montreal eaves contain only from 0 to 4 inches of insulation.  (Note:  It is generally more advantageous to install from 12 to 14 inches for a thermal resistance of R-42 to R-49, if cellulose is used, it being the most economical insulation for attics.)
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Winter blues? Why not start a remodelling project?

February can be a long and sometimes depressing month for some people. It can be quite a grim month where as in March, we finally get a glimpse of milder weather and temperature. Thank God February has only 29 days this year! Using one's creativity has long been proven to be a method that is helpful in chasing away the blues. And speaking of creativity, why not start that remodelling project you've been thinking of for so long? Or why not start looking at colors you may want to change in your home? This exercise can be very beneficial and healthy. It is even said to be healing. Here is what Cricket Demarais states in an article written about "Letting Color heal you":

Lack of Color Causes Depression

How we "feel" about color is more than psychological. The last decade has proven that lack of color, or more specifically, light, causes millions to suffer each winter from a mild depression known as Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). Because of the complex way in which exposure to various colors acts via the brain upon the autonomic nervous system, exposure to a specific color can even alter physiological measurements such as blood pressure, electrical skin resistance and glandular functions in your body. And they most certainly can affect how you feel on a day-to-day basis. Learning about color's qualities and putting it to use can enhance your spirit, improve your health, and quite ultimately, expand your consciousness. You may also get a glimpse on the different meanings and symbolisms of colors. Here is relatively good web site that talks about it: http://www.squidoo.com/colorexpert. Finally, another handy way to sweep away the winter blues is to surf the net in search of ideas and inspiration for remodelling projects, ideas and tips. Here are just a few I found: www.hgtv.com/hgtv/remodeling www.getdecorating.com/ www.homefixpro.com/home_remodeling_and_renovating_article.php?artID=19 www.superkitchens.com

FlexHousing, building for adaptability

What if the home you are planning to build could be your family home for the rest of your life?  What if, with a little planning, your new home could adapt to meet the needs of your family and change as your family does?

That’s the idea behind FlexHousing.  A FlexHouse is a home designed before construction begins to be user friendly to its occupants at all stages of their lives and to make future renovations easier and cheaper for the homeowner to complete.  FlexHousing can eliminate the need to move from house to house as the requirements of your family change over time.

WHY FLEXHOUSING

The first home for many couples is often referred to as a “starter” home, which is typically small and easy to maintain.  Then, as children come along the first home is too small and that requires the costly and disruptive choice of moving.  When the children are grown and on their own this second home becomes too large for only two people to take care of.

As the population ages, half of all homes in Canada will house people 55 yeas old or older by 2017.  Also, with a declining population, fewer new homes will be built each year.  So homes that are flexible will be in big demand.  This flexibility not only is beneficial to the home, but if families don’t have the need to move, they stay in the neighbourhood longer, creating a stronger sense of community.

PRINCIPLES OF FLEXHOUSING

A FlexHouse isn’t a type of home style like a bungalow or two storey, it is the way it is designed prior to construction and is based on four principles.

• Adaptability
• Accessibility
• Affordability
• Healthy Housing

Adaptability:  The home is designed to be renovated to suit changing needs.

A large bedroom can be made into two smaller rooms and used as either another bedroom or home office.

A space such as the basement can be renovated to become a separate apartment by roughing in plumbing for a kitchen and bathroom that will bring in extra income later on or be used by an aging relative.

Bathroom walls can be given extra strength during construction to allow for the installing of grab bars and other special items to assist less mobile residents.
Install counters and cabinets in the kitchen or bathroom that can be adjusted vertically on brackets or that can have sections that are lower so that people in a wheelchair can reach with them.

Building such features into a new home during initial construction saves time, money and inconvenience when changes are needed or desired down the road.

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